Bredo uses cast-off sections as LWB consolidates

31 Mar 2011
Stena sections find a good home at space-hungry Bredo.

Stena sections find a good home at space-hungry Bredo.

German repair facility Bremerhavener Dock (Bredo) is using a relatively slack period to save costs and complete a novel repair-related project in a deal which appears to have done everyone some good.

Tom Todd writes: The yard bought four no-longer-needed sections from a recent conversion from nearby Lloyd Werft Bremerhaven (LWB) and is using them to create a new floating storage and work hall. The busy yard, located on a narrow tongue of land, is always in need of additional space, leasing capacity elsewhere when needed.

Dirk Harms, who assists MD Norbert Jurczyk, told The Motorship Bredo had bought two unwanted 12m long and 9m high midship bottom sections each of 240 tonnes and their two 12m long deck sections of about 140 tonnes after the recent shortening of the ro-ro ferries Stena Trader and Stena Traveller at LWB.

The two midship bottom sections were welded together in Bredo’s Dock 3 and the two car deck sections were then mounted on the bottoms. Harms said the 24m long new structure is now being adapted to Bredo needs and will be moored adjacent to the yard when finished. A further 340m2 multi-purpose hall was being built on land by March.

Harms reported a good if quiet situation at the Bremerhaven yard last year with docks well occupied, albeit “almost exclusively” with routine and general docking work.

Elsewhere, LWB was gearing up for some big cruise ship refit work. Starting mid March was what owners TUI called the “comprehensive renovation and modernisation” of the 76,522gt Mein Schiff 11 (ex Mercury) after LWB, as expected, bagged the €50 million refit.

The 14 year old Meyer-built ship will arrive on 14 March and remain until 20 April. In work similar to that undertaken on sister Mein Schiff 1 (ex Galaxy) in 2009, she is getting balconies on outside cabins. When complete, she will boast 956 cabins and 422 of her 646 outside cabins will have balconies or verandas.

As with Mein Schiff 1 a 370 tonne duck’s tail will be fitted to balance the weight of new balconies and sponsons were being added to improve stability. Fitness and spa areas are being extended, gastronomic facilities revamped and air-conditioning system renewed and enlarged.

Just what will happen with Mercury’s engine plant and equipment was not clear as The Motorship went to press. TUI would not divulge technical details, however LWB reported that Mein Schiff 1 underwent extensive overhaul of main engines and equipment.

Due to dock in April is the 44,588gt Artemis (ex Royal Princess) for her second visit to LWB in a year  for what LWB said was “comprehensive renovation and partial conversion”. She will get balconies on 96 cabins, various steel repairs, extensive pipe repairs, propulsion plant, stabiliser and bow thruster maintenance as well as hull painting below and top of waterline. She will leave the yard in late May under the new name of Artania.

In recent cargo ship work at LWB, the 60,350 dwt container ship Magleby Maersk docked for repainting and also was renamed MSC Pilar.

B+V finally enters into foreign hands

After a year in which it docked 14 cruise and passenger ships, among others, Blohm + Voss Repair got off to a good start for 2011 with a cruise ship refit and the overhaul of a pipe-layer.

A key element in the week-long refurbishment of regular caller, the nearly 40 year old 28,388gt Boudicca, in early January, was, said owners Fred Olsen Lines, the relocation of the fitness centre from deck 4 to the top of the ship on deck 10 – which is the same location as the fitness centre on sistership Black Watch. On Boudicca, this created space for 17 new interior cabins. The last of the cruise line’s open lifeboats were also replaced.

The 56,172gt pipe-layer Audacia, owned by the Swiss-based Allseas Group, arrived in November and departed late February after drydocking in the yard’s Dock 11 for what B+V spokesman Michael Brasse said was “extensive modernisation work”. Reports said that included general maintenance but also the exchange of thrusters.

Rounding off a busy 2010 was the 10-day docking in Elbe 17 in December of the 90,000gt Queen Victoria for general and class repairs. It was her first yard visit since entering service in 2007 and Cunard said B+V had been chosen because of “excellent co-operation on routine checks, maintenance and demanding propulsion systems work”, during earlier visits by Queen Mary 2.

The owner said work on Queen Victoria included propulsion plant overhaul and routine maintenance of her three bow thrusters and stabilisers. Painting, winch modifications, anchor cable inspection and tank cleaning were also carried out and ship’s 16 tenders and lifeboats were checked.

2011 will, reportedly, see the finalisation of the purchase of B+V, founded in 1877 and in German hands ever since, by Abu Dhabi Mar (ADM). Reports said that was now expected by March. The deal was clinched in October 2009 and had been expected to take effect last year. Reports said the delay had to do with the involvement of Abu Dhabi’s Mubadala sovereign fund, one of the world’s leading state finance bodies, and reflected the importance being attached to the purchase by the Arab emirate.

Repairs at Nobiskrug

Nobiskrug on the Kiel Canal has redelivered the mini-bulker Malaga after repair of extensive damage sustained in a collision with a container ship on the waterway last November. The Rendsburg yard, owned by Abu Dhabi Mar, completed work on the 82m long, 4000 dwt Malaga in just over a month, replacing eleven tonnes of steel.

Another recent Nobiskrug cargo customer was the 6,970 dwt Turkish tanker Kardeniz, which docked at the yard’s leased Dock V at HDW in nearby Kiel. During a two-week stay, following discovery of an oil leak in the propeller plant, the ship’s shaft and variable pitch propeller were removed, overhauled and remounted.

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