New ‘green’ Handysize contract signed

29 Feb 2012
Computer generated image of the Deltamarin B.Delta37 standard bulk carrier

Computer generated image of the Deltamarin B.Delta37 standard bulk carrier

With mounting commercial and environmental pressure on the shipping industry to reduce emissions and fuel consumption, it’s encouraging to see that an increasing number of shipowners are ordering more efficient vessels.

A recent example is the order placed by a Singaporean ship operator for a number of highly efficient Handysize bulk carriers. Ordered by MT Maritime Management Group and Strategic Shipping, the four very low fuel consumption bulkers were designed by the Finnish-based Deltamarin Group, which signed an agreement with the Chinese shipbuilder Tianjin Xingang Shipbuilding Heavy Industry, part of CSIC Group, for the construction of the vessels. Deltamarin will take care of the basic and detail designs of the vessels as well as being responsible for technical procurement handling, and will have a team on site to take the design to production. Design work will be carried out at Deltamarin’s offices in Europe and China, making use of the partner network. Tianjin Xingang Shipbuilding, which is located in the Bohai Sea of the Tianjin Binhai New Area, is scheduled to deliver the vessels in April, July, September and December 2013.

This is the second order for the B.Delta37 standard bulk carrier design, which has evoked the interest of the market with its improved deadweight, cubic capacity and especially the extremely low fuel consumption compared to other available designs. With an overall vessel length of 179.99m, a beam of 30m and a scantling draught of 10.50m, the newbuildings will have a deadweight of 40,000 tonnes at scantling draught. The vessels will have five cargo holds with a total carrying capacity of 50,000m3 of cargo, and will be fitted with four sets of electro-hydraulically driven 30 tonne/26m deck cranes of the two-wire type.

Forecasts suggest a daily fuel oil consumption at design draught of 18 tonnes, including 15% sea margin, ISO condition. Annual output of CO2 is estimated to be reduced by 5,000 tonnes compared to existing vessels in the same size range. The design work will be carried out at Deltamarin’s offices in Europe and China and through the partner network.

A propulsion power plant consisting of a single 8,900kW MAN B&W 5S50 ME-B9.2 two-stroke diesel engine (derated to MCR 6050kW at 99rpm), drives a FP propeller to give a service speed at design draught of 14.0 knots. The 6m diameter four-bladed propeller is optimised for an even wake for greater efficiency while the Deltamarin designed, yard manufactured rudder has improved steering and flow properties. Three auxiliary gensets provide ship service power. Other energy-saving devices include an optimised hull design, a combined oil and exhaust gas-fired steam boiler, and stator fins designed by Deltamarin and manufactured by the shipyard.  

Deltamarin says it has 21 bulk carriers on order to its designs, with several options already signed for Panamax, Lakers and B.Delta37 types. All vessel types have been tested at the HSVA model basin in Hamburg with reported very good correlation to full scale.

The first B.Delta37 standard designs are being built for the French shipowner Louis Dreyfus Armateurs, also at Tianjin Xingang shipyard. Derivative designs of B.Delta are currently under construction at Nantong Mingde Heavy Industry (Laker Bulk Carriers and Self Unloaders) and at Chengxi Shipyard, part of CSSC Group (Panamax Self Unloaders). Deltamarin reports serious, ongoing discussions with several ship owners for continuation of the B.Delta25, B.Delta37, B.Delta64 and B.Delta82 series. The lower fuel and operating costs and added cargo capacity are claimed to interest ship owners, while the lower light ship weight resulting in less required steel and the optimised hull form benefit shipyards. The B.Delta37 series has been further developed with several alternative designs including box-shape holds for steel and coil cargoes, ice class, timber deck cargo and similar.

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