Statoil and Eidesvik report battery savings

The PSV 'Viking Energy' has cut its fuel bill and C2 emissions significantly since batteries were installed in 2015 The PSV 'Viking Energy' has cut its fuel bill and C2 emissions significantly since batteries were installed in 2015

Ship owner Eidesvik Offshore and charterer Statoil, charterer of the LNG-battery have reported better than expected savings since the installation of batteries on platform supply vessel (PSV) ‘Viking Energy’ in 2015.

The ship was built as a dual-fuel LNG-powered vessel in 2003 and had one engine replaced with a 653 kWh/1600 kW battery in 2015. According to an article on Statoil’s website, Viking Energy’s fuel consumption has been reduced by 16-17%, with reductions as high as 28% in dynamic positioning mode. The owner reported that operations onboard have also been simplified because of consistent power supplied by the batteries and the reduced demand for generator maintenance.

Frida Eklöf Monstad, manager marine, logistics and emergency response at Statoil, notes in the report: “Battery operation and power from shore have been very effective in reducing emissions, and ships that exploit these opportunities are therefore prioritised when contracts are awarded. We’re also working on improving the efficiency of loading capacity at the ports and adapting the speed of the vessels to reduce fuel consumption and emissions.”

In June 2017, Statoil awarded contracts to seven vessels, all of which are due to install batteries and shore power connections. The company’s supply base in Florø will be the first to set up shore power for ships, while base operator NorSea Group has received grants from Norwegian innovation agency Enova to ensure power supplies at all other bases along the coast.

Statoil’s marine operations department for the Norwegian continental shelf has set a target of reducing CO2 emissions by 32% by 2020. This goal was nearly achieved in 2016, and the company is now developing a more ambitious target.

At a recent press event Rolls-Royce Marine, which is supplying battery systems for six newbuild PSVs ordered by Seacor, predicted that the majority of offshore support vessels will in future be built with battery systems.

LATEST PRESS RELEASES

Great anniversary year – 60 years of Geislinger & 25 years of “Gesilco®“

Geislinger GmbH, located in Salzburg, Austria, celebrates its 60th anniversary this year which coinc... Read more

MYTASKIT NAMES PACSOFT FIRST INTERNATIONAL RESELLER

Expanding its global presence, MyTaskit has signed its first international reseller. Auckland, New Z... Read more

Vickers Oils are pleased to welcome Ian Bower, Business Development Manager and Esther Murray

Vickers Oils are pleased to welcome Ian Bower, Business Development Manager and Esther Murray, Marke... Read more

SHAFT VIBRATION ELIMINATED WITH VESCONITE HILUBE

After replacing the all-rubber cutlass bearing of his new Jeanneau Sun Fast 35 Tide The Knot a frust... Read more

S/V BRYANA COMPLETES 30,000 NM WITH VESCONITE

A mid-ocean loss of steerage due to a faulty rudder bearing wasn't a scenario Luke Fisher wanted to ... Read more

Experts Highlight Viable Power and Propulsion Solutions for Next Generation Vessels

Lithium-ion battery expert Dr John Warner is presenting at the NEXT GENERATION Marine Power & Propul... Read more

View all